Mind Your Life

Mind Your Life: How Mindfulness Can Build Resilience and Reveal Your Extraordinary was a challenging read. Not because of the depth of the material or the inclusion of verbose vocabulary. Rather, it was difficult because I have zero experience with mindfulness.

The book is largely based off the work of Shinzen Young, a fact that Meg Salter discusses in her special recognition. I will provide an overview of the book and then my final thoughts.

The book does an excellent job weaving the personal stories of the author (Meg Salter) and others throughout the chapters. She begins with the basics (the third chapter Changes to Brain and Body and develops the key concepts of mindfulness. She defines it as “learning to pay attention to what’s happening in the present moment in the mind, body and external environment.” (Salter, 20) The book flairs when Salter discusses the practical applications of mindfulness, beginning with chapter seven and ending with chapter eleven. I really appreciate how practical the book is. I find books addressing similar topics to be woefully lacking in these life-changing ways.

I mentioned before, but I really enjoy the life stories of both the author and various individuals. It gives a real-life feel to the book. One can read of the benefits mindfulness has had with a recovering PTSD individual to people struggling to survive in life.

With all of this said, there are limits to what mindfulness can achieve. I think the religious and cultural barriers present difficulties with the general understanding of mindfulness. Simply paying attention to one’s “happening in the present moment” will not be a fix-all to every problem we face. Salter acknowledges this on page 6, but then goes on to suggest a different form of mindfulness will suffice.

It was certainly a challenging read, but one that I do not see as being helpful for my current stage in life. However, you may find it to be the opposite.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author and/or publisher through the Speakeasy blogging book review network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR,Part 255.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s