Guided by Gurnall: Part Seven

In his exposition of Ephesians 6:10-20, William Gurnall notes the need for the Christian to wear armor. He plainly writes, “The Christian must be armed for the War.” (Gurnall, 45)

In his opening discussion of Ephesians 6:11, he provides the importance of regeneration. Without God’s saving grace, the individual is in “a Christless graceless state.” (Gurnall, 45) He goes on to describe this terrible situation, “A soul out of Christ is naked and destitute of all armour to defend him against sin and Satan.” (Gurnall, 45)

CONSIDER THE ENEMY

This thought should immediately strike fear into our hearts. Satan is no thin, red devil running around with a pitchfork. He is the prince of darkness (Eph. 6:12, cf. Col. 1:13), and the god of this world (2 Cor. 4:4). He has vast power, so much so that even Michael would not bring an accusation against him (Jude 9). He walks around like a lion “seeking someone to devour” (1 Pet. 5:8, ESV). While Christians should fear God, we must be careful not to approach the great enemy of our souls in a haphazard manner.

CONSIDER THE STATE OF THE UNREGENERATE

As Christians, our greatest privilege is to share the Gospel with people. We seek to evangelize the lost, to see Satan’s kingdom of darkness overcome with the light and love of Jesus. But in our efforts to preach the Gospel, we must remember the state of those to whom we preach.

Gurnall offers four “notions” of those in this Christless state. (Gurnall, 46)

“IT IS A STATE OF ALIENATION FROM GOD” (Gurnall, 46)

Paul encourages believers to remember their hopeless state before Christ (see Eph. 2:12). All people, regardless of skin color, sexual orientation, political view, economic status, or any other class, who have not been born again at in a state of alienation from God. Gurnall states their sad case, “He is without God in the world; he can claim no more protection from God, than an out-lawed subject from his prince.” (Gurnall, 46) The people to whom we communicate the Gospel have no protection from the God of heaven.

“THE CHRISTLESS STATE IS A STATE OF IGNORANCE, AND SUCH MUST NEEDS BE NAKED AND UNARMED” (Gurnall, 46)

This spiritual war, unobserved to the natural eye, wages all over. The sad state is one of complete ignorance. Gurnall remarks, “He that cannot see his enemy, how can he ward off the blow he sends?” (Gurnall, 46) As we share the Gospel, the Christless people of earth have no idea of the enemy’s attacks. They are open, exposed, like a nerve without a tooth. They experience great pain, but are unaware of the enemy’s affliction. Let us pray that God will deliver them out of the kingdom of darkness and into the kingdom of light!

“THE CHRISTLESS STATE IS A STATE OF IMPOTENCY” (Gurnall, 47)

The souls to whom we preach are impotent. They cannot fight their own flesh, let alone the devil. What hope have they? They have no armor, nor a Protector. They have no weapons, nor a Defender. Gurnall describes their plight, “What the Spirit of God doth in a saint, that in a manner doth Satan in a sinner. The Spirit fills the heart with love, joy, holy desires, fears; so Satan fills the sinner’s heart with pride, lust, lying.” (Gurnall, 47) Imagine the desperate plight of these bearers of the image of God!

“THE STATE OF UNREGENERACY IS A STATE FRIENDSHIP WITH SIN AND SATAN” (Gurnall, 47)

The state of Christless souls is one of friendship with sin and Satan. Remember  James’ words, “Do you not know that friendship with the world is hostility toward God? Therefore, whoever wishes to be a friend of the world makes himself an enemy of God” (James 4:4, NASB). No Christless soul can be a friend of God, nor can it be an enemy of Satan. Gurnall even discusses the possibility of when an individual seems to be fighting against sin and Satan. He writes, “Sometimes indeed there appears a scuffle between Stan and a carnal heart, but it is a mere cheat, like the fighting of two fencers on a stage. You would think at first they were in earnest, but observing how wary they are, [and] where they hit one another, you may soon know they do not mean to kill; and that which puts all out of doubt, when the prize is done you shall see them making merry together with what they have got of their spectators, which was all they fought for.” (Gurnall, 47-48)

CONSIDER OUR DUTY

As Christians, we are to don this armor in order to fight our own wars. We still have indwelling sin, and we are told to fight against it in the power of God’s might. We must remember, consider, meditate upon the destructive nature and devilish desires of our enemies.

As Christians, we are to fight against the powers of darkness through the grace of God. Gurnall discusses the weapons of our warfare later, but for now we need to remember the plight of the Christless soul. What are we doing to tell people the Gospel? How are we evangelizing the lost?

May we be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might!

 

MORE IN THE SERIES

Guided by Gurnall: Introduction

Guided by Gurnall: Part One

Guided by Gurnall: Part Two

Guided by Gurnall: Part Two

Guided by Gurnall: Part Three

Guided by Gurnall: Part Four

Guided By Gurnall: Part Five

Guided by Gurnall: Part Six

Advertisements

A Study in Affliction: The Sufficiency of God’s Word in Psalm 119 for the Believer’s Affliction (Part 1)

In a previous post, we begin a brief overview of affliction as it appears in Psalm 119. The subject of affliction appears seven times in the mammoth psalm. We begin with the first appearance of affliction in Psalm 119:50.

David pens these words,

“This is my comfort in my affliction, that your promise gives me life.” (ESV)

A BRIEF DEFINITION

Affliction is translated from the Hebrew word עני, which, according to one lexicon, means “affliction, poverty.” Another possible definition is “misery.” No matter which one you choose, the picture is not pleasant.

The connection with affliction and the trials we face are obvious. We are all afflicted with a variety of problems. They vary in significance and intensity, but they afflict us all. This broad understanding helps us in every situation, and is another evidence of the complete sufficiency of God’s Word for all our problems.

CAN THERE BE COMFORT IN AFFLICTION?

If you are like me, you may find yourself asking the question, “Can there be comfort in affliction?” It would appear to be an oxymoron to many of us. Imagine finding comfort while mourning the loss of a spouse. Try to find comfort when the doctor informs you that you have six months to live. Look for comfort when your bills are more than your income.

These are all severe cases, but what about the “little things”? Can you find comfort when you are late to work? Is there comfort for your car breaking down once again? Does a severed relationship with a friend at school make room for comfort?

Can comfort be present in affliction, severe or little?

David’s answer is a resounding yes. Contrary to the marred thinking of sinful human beings (see Ephesians 4:17-18), Christians can find comfort during times of affliction.

A LIFE CHANGING TRUTH

Is this not wonderful news? Regardless of the scenario of affliction, the believer can receive comfort. Though the trials will vary in intensity and timing, we can find comfort, true and life-infusing comfort.

The idea is consolation. We all need to be comforted, to feel that everything will be alright. God’s Word comforts us. Like feasting on chicken noodle soup after a bout with sickness, God’s Word provides healing down to the very depths of our souls.

LIFE GIVING PROMISE

How does David find comfort during times of affliction? David says, “your promise gives me life” (Psalm 119:50, ESV). The promise found in the sacred Scriptures provide life-infusing comfort during those times of adversity.

The question remains, what promise?

For that, you will have to wait until the next post.

God’s Mercy and Our Daily Bread

Thomas Manton’s An Exposition of the Lord’s Prayer has been a remarkable work. My soul has been filled, my heart has been challenged, and my joy has been stirred. The depth to which the Lord’s Prayer can be plumbed is, in my estimation, unimaginable.

Yet Thomas Manton has performed a wonderful work by presenting one more beautiful facet of the Lord’s Prayer. It comes on the petition, “Give us this day our daily bread.” (Matthew 6:11, NASB)

Though his treatment of this verse spans seventeen pages, I found one point particular spectacular. Manton writes,

Ps. cxxxvi. 25, you have there the story of the notable effects of God’s mercy, and he concludes it thus: ‘Who giveth food to all flesh; for his mercy endureth forever.’ Mark, the psalmist doth not only ascribe those mighty victories, those glorious instances of his love and power, to his unchangeable mercy, but our daily bread. In eminent deliverances of the church we will acknowledge mercy; yea, but we should do it in every bit of meat we eat, for the same reason is rendered all along.

….It is not only mercy which gives us Christ, and slavation by Christ, and all those glorious deliverances and triumphs over the enemies of the church; but it is mercy which furnisheth our tables, it is mercy that we taste with our mouths and wear at our backs.

(Thomas Manton, Works, Volume 1, 154-155)

I just read that Psalm this morning in my private reading. What powerful thoughts! Every time we pray for God’s provision for our daily sustenance, it is because His mercy endures forever.

What a glorious thought! Have you contemplated this truth today? Do you realize that everything you have been gifted is all because of God’s mercy and provision? Imagine how different our lives would be if we, like Jesus instructed us to, prayed “Give us this day our daily bread.”

 

4 Ways to Minister Like the Angels: A Word from T. Manton

In his exposition of the Lord’s Prayer, Thomas Manton provides biblical insight, pastoral application, and enthusiastic advice. Jesus prays in Matthew 6:10, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” (NKJV)

In developing the idea of the execution of God’s will on earth like it is in heaven, T. Manton discusses the angels. One thing I love about the Puritans is they were extremely practical. “How does this apply to my life?” was a question they incessantly asked of every passage of Scripture.

Manton mentions four ways you and I can minister like the angels.

“IN CONFORMITY TO THE ANGELS, WE MUST SERVE GOD READILY” (148)

As Scripture pictures angels with wings (see Isaiah 6:2) to execute God’s will swiftly, so we must seek to do God’s will in haste. Manton remarks in his typical fashion, “It is not enough to keep God’s commandments, but we must make haste; that is, before the strength of the present impulsion be lost, and those fervours which are upon us be cooled.” (Manton, “Works,” Volume 1, 148)

One way to minister like the angels is to do so immediately.

“WILLINGLY AND CHEERFULLY, WITHOUT MURMURING” (148)

How many of us are guilty of begrudgingly serving our Lord? We ‘do’ His will because we have to do so. In this we are more like the devils, as Manton remarks, than the angels.

He writes, “When we do things with reluctancy, murmuringly, we are more like the devils than the angels. When the devils obey his word, they are forced to do so by the absolute power of Christ; yet they do it not with willingness and freeness, as the good angels do.” (Manton, “Works,” Volume 1, 148)

Does our execution of God’s will mimic the angels, or the demons?

“CONSTANTLY AND UNWEARIEDLY” (148)

We are prone to weakness of the body. Our spirits give up after long bouts with temptation. We are reminded to “not grow weary while doing good, for in due season we shall reap if we do not lose heart.” (Galatians 6:9, NKJV)

This is why a daily time with God is so vital. We need God’s grace to be saved. We need God’s grace to be like Him. Manton remarks, “God in communion is ever new and fresh to them; the face of their heavenly Father is as lovely as at the first moment; no weariness or satiety creeps upon those good spirits. Thus should we do it without weariness, and then we shall reap if we faint not.” (Manton, “Works,” Volume 1, 148-149)

Be like the angels and constantly do God’s will (in His strength, of course!).

“FAITHFULLY, NOT PICKING AND CHOOSING” (149)

The angels do God’s will regardless of what it is. For personal edification, using a concordance (or a online Bible), look up angels and see the variety of tasks to which they are assigned. They always do God’s will.

Like the angels, you and I are assigned different tasks. Perhaps we are given a glorious work (like announcing the arrival of the Messiah, Luke 1:8-14). Or, we may be given a behind-the-scenes task (like ministering to saints throughout the ages, Hebrews 1:14). Either way, we never read of angels bucking at God’s will or only doing part of it.

One important point Manton makes is, “‘They hearken to the voice of his word,’ whatever it be, be it to ascend or descend. So we, if it be to go backward for God, though it be against the bent of our hearts.” (Manton, “Works,” Volume 1, 149)

Has God called us to descend? Let us do it with trust in our sovereignly, good Heavenly Father.

These are four ways we can minister like the angels. Let us always, in all places, circumstances, and experiences, pray, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” (Matthew 6:10, NKJV)

3 Encouragements from God’s Sovereignty

Doctrine leads to practice. This is a truth that many in the church today have apparently forgotten. I have been sitting with fellow church members from various congregations who informed me that doctrine is boring, lifeless, and impractical. Like decorative pillows that are taken off before bed and placed back upon waking, people see doctrine in the same light.

I have also heard people, including pastors, say that theology and doctrine do not really matter. This, according to Scripture, is absurd. For the sake of space, we will simply look at one example. In 1 Corinthians 12:3, Paul writes, “Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says ‘Jesus is accursed!’ and no one can say ‘Jesus is Lord’ except in the Holy Spirit.” (ESV) Jesus is Lord is a doctrinal statement. Of course, there are contextual issues that are involved with Paul’s mentioning of this, but it illustrates that without doctrine, we have nothing.

Theology proper (that which focuses on God) tells us that God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnipresent. This information is gleaned from the sacred Scriptures. But this information, or doctrine, has profound implications. If God has all-power, there is no problem that you and I will face that He is unable to address. If God is omniscient, then there is nothing of which God does not have full and exact knowledge. If God is omnipresent, then you and I are never truly alone.

Doctrine leads to practice. And doctrine is practical. God’s sovereignty is blissfully practical. I want to focus on three ways, and I hope this accomplishes two goals:

  1. To increase your desire to learn the doctrines of the Bible
  2. To increase your awareness of the practicality of doctrine

 

GOD’S SOVEREIGNTY MEANS THAT NOTHING HAPPENS BY ACCIDENT


Now, this has enormous applications, some that are easy to believe and some that, beyond God’s grace, are incomprehensible.

The psalmist declares,

Our God is in the heavens;

he does all that he please. (Psalm 115:3, ESV)

There is so much more the Scriptures say about God’s sovereignty. Check out this free resource at Monergism.

This verse, along with other Scripture, teaches us that God is in control of every particle of creation, orchestrating all things for His glory and the believer’s good (Romans 8:28). John Calvin states, “Not even a drop of rain falls without His express command.” (Calvin, Institutes)

jeshoots-com-632498-unsplash.jpg
Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

On Monday morning when your alarm clock fails to go off, God is in control. When your child breaks in the middle of the bike path causing you to bang your knee in an effort not to run him over, God is in control. When you sit through the stop light, again, God is in control. When the doctor brings you bad news, God is in control. 

The beautiful part of God’s sovereignty, however, is not just that nothing happens by accident.

GOD’S SOVEREIGNTY IS DISPLAYED BY THE MOST GRACIOUS BEING


That God is sovereign is sweetly displayed throughout all of Scripture. That God is also a gracious and good God is also displayed. John records of God, “God is love.” (1 John 4:8, ESV) Moses beautifully describes God as

“…a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness…” (Exodus 34:6, ESV)

If God were just sovereign, we might have reason to fear. For a human example, if Adolf Hitler had unlimited power, imagine what destruction he would reign all over the earth. And if God were sovereign, but also evil, we would be in unimaginable trouble. But God is kind, He is gracious, He abounds in steadfast love and faithfulness.

This means that on Monday morning when your alarm clock fails to go off, God is gracious. Perhaps He is preventing you from leaving on time, avoiding a fatal accident. When your child breaks in the middle of the bike path causing you to bang your knee in an effort not to run him over, God is gracious. Perhaps God is allowing this instance to come into your life in order to conform you into the image of His most patient Son, Jesus Christ. When you sit through the stop light, again, God is gracious. Maybe God knows that a certain song that will speak truth and encouragement into your life will come on before you get to school. When the doctor brings you bad news, God is gracious. It is possible that God knows that the only way you can grow closer to Him is to work through that medical issue.

sergey-shmidt-229811-unsplash
Flowers offer a beautiful display of God’s goodness. He could have made flowers unpleasing to the eyes, unpleasant to the nose, and unhelpful to the bees. But the variety, beautiful, and intricacies of the flowers are only one display of His sovereign goodness.

Do you see just how awesome doctrine is? This can transform your life! That nothing happens by accident, and that all things are orchestrated by the most benevolent Being have enormous implications. But there is one final point that I want to draw out from this doctrine.

GOD’S SOVEREIGNTY MEANS THAT, EVEN IN THE MIDST OF THE MOST UNIMAGINABLE PAIN, GOD IS STILL SOVEREIGN


I must admit, that I have had a great life. God has been so good to me. I grew up in a loving family. I married the most amazing woman in the history of our planet. I have three of the most precious children in the world. And I was born in Texas.

A few years ago my wife and I happily found out we were pregnant. However, upon our first visit, our little baby was measuring smaller than the baby should have been. The doctor informed us that this does not mean that something is wrong, but she also mentioned that it was not good.

At the next appointment, the doctor informed us that the baby would not make it to full term. We were devastated. At this point, we had two healthy children, and the idea that we might lose a baby had never entered into our minds. You can imagine the questions that raced through our minds. How could God let this happen? Why is God doing this to us? We love our children, doesn’t He know that we will take Good care of that baby?

It was a difficult time in our life. But God was gracious to us. He provided comfort in a way that exceeds our comprehension. The truth of Romans 8:28 was a constant retreat from the devastation. Consider some of the most encouraging words penned by Paul,

And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose. (Romans 8:28, ESV)

This verse teaches us that God works all things for good. It does not say that we will understand how it works for good. One account I constantly returned to was Joseph’s life. Imagine the questions he must have had. Sold by his brothers, lied about and punished for a sin he never committed, Joseph must have constantly asked God why? But when you read Joseph’s summary, Joseph’s belief in the sovereignty of God was a rock of comfort. Joseph tells his brothers,

Do not fear, for am I in the place of God? As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today. (Genesis 50:19-20)

Joseph did not know why he was going through what he did. But his belief in the sovereignty of God voided his need to know why because he knew Who. Perhaps you are in the midst of a suffering that many people cannot fathom. Dive into the deep love and sovereignty of God. You may never know why, but you can rest in Him. God’s truth is foundation upon which we can rest.

CONCLUSION


Doctrine leads to practice. It changes the way we think, speak, and live. God’s sovereignty is a doctrine in the Scriptures. Search them, learn about God’s control of everything. Meditate on the truth that God is a good God. And resolve to trust God more than your desire to know why. Doctrine leads to practice. And the doctrine of God’s sovereignty leads to a peace that passes our understanding.

“Brothers, We Are Not Professionals”: A Prayer

I began rereading John Piper’s book, Brothers, We Are Not Professionals: A Plea to Pastors for Radical MinistryThere are several books that I work through regularly (Richard Baxter’s The Reformed Pastor is highest on the list). Each book stirs up a different flame of passion, a great awareness of personal sin, and a earnest desire to be the kind of pastor that truly honors the Lord Jesus Christ.

At the end of each chapter, Piper offers a prayer that accompanies the topic. For today’s reading, I was deeply moved by it. I hope that it provides you, pastor or not, with a greater desire to know our sovereign and holy God.

Piper prays,

God, delivery us from the professionalizers! Deliver us from the ‘low, managing, contriving, maneuvering temper of mind among us.’ (Bounds, 1972) God, give us tears for our sins. Forgive us for being so shallow in prayer, so thin in our grasp of holy verities, so content amid perishing neighbors, so empty of passion and earnestness in all our conversation. Restore to us the childlike joy of our salvation. Frighten us with the awesome holiness and power of Him who can cast both soul and body into hell (Matt. 10:28). Cause us to hold to the cross with fear and trembling as our hope-filled and offensive tree of life. Grant us nothing, absolutely nothing, the way the world views it. May Christ be all in all (Col. 3:11).

Banish professionalism from our midst, Oh God, and in its place put passionate prayer, poverty of spirit, hunger for God, rigorous study of holy things, white-hot devotion to Jesus Christ, utter indifference to all material gain, and unremitting labor to rescue the perishing, perfect the saints, and glorify our sovereign Lord.

Humble us, O God, under Your mighty hand, and let us rise, not as professionals, but as witnesses and partakers of the sufferings of Christ. In His awesome name. Amen. (Piper, 4)

Brother pastors, let us resolve to ever be in this prayer!

3 Reasons Genealogies Are In the Bible

We all wonder why God allowed genealogies in the Bible. If you find yourself reading through the Bible in a year (or any other length of time), you may even dread it! The endless list of names you can barely spell, the mountains of individuals whose pronunciation you will butcher, and the disconnect from little to no knowledge about the individual causes genealogies to leave a bad taste in our mouths (think of burnt popcorn).

But Paul writes that “All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.” (II Timothy 3:16-17, ESV) This means that, yes, even genealogies are profitable. We are like children taking medicine. It tastes horrible, and our little brains cannot imagine how something so gross could possibly help us.

So, how do genealogies help us? How are they profitable? This list is certainly not exhaustive, nor is it original. I have read different commentaries, articles, and journals over the years. (If one of them sticks out, please send me the source so I can properly cite it!) The thoughts I am sharing this morning stem from that research. However, I want to offer three reasons why genealogies are in the Bible. My hope is to inspire you to cling to the truths of Scripture (see II Timothy 3:16-17), and to build your confidence in God’s wisdom.

Genealogies teach us that God works with individuals in His plan of redemption

One of the benefits of genealogies is that it shows us that God works with individuals. We tend to think of groups such as Israel, Judah, or the Levites. Or, when we do think of individuals, we think only of the big whigs: David, John the Baptist, or Paul. But what about the Loises and Eunices of the Bible (see II Timothy 1:5)? Even “insignificant” people have profound impacts in God’s plan of redemption. No one knows the names of the pit crew members (unless you are a fan of Nascar), but without them the racers would never be known. Genealogies teach us that God works with individuals, many of whom we will never really know, in His plan of redemption. What is your part in this plan? Perhaps you have thought your own life too common to make any significant impact in God’s work of redemption. Take encouragement from the genealogies. They show us that God works with individuals like you and like me.

Genealogies teach us that God works in the mundane

The second reason genealogies are in the Bible, though not second in order or significance, is that they teach us that God works in the mundane. Now, don’t get me wrong, the birth of the child is a miracle. Besides my salvation and marriage, the most exciting moments in my life we’re meeting three of our four children. There is nothing mundane about the birth of a precious baby. At the same time, however, it is mundane, at least in the broad sense. Parents have children, those children grow up, get married, and have children. It is mundane. Genealogies are not unlike this. After the tenth “And (insert name you cannot pronounce) begat (insert second but equally un-pronounceable name)…” you realize just how mundane genealogies truly are. The glaze over your eyes and the blank stare bring you back to fourth grade. But an amazing truth lies underneath the common experiences of life: God works in them. Have you ever stopped and considered that for rough thirty years Jesus did the mundane elements of life? He would wake up, eat, work, come home, attend synagogue, and repeat. Day after day. Year after year. Yet, this was part of God’s redemptive plan to save countless numbers of people. Genealogies are an expression of God’s work in the mundane. How do you view the mundane of life? Did you ever stop to consider that the mundane of life my be God’s way of using you in His plan of redemption?

Genealogies teach us humility

The final reason genealogies are in the Bible is to teach us humility. There are several ways this is observed. First, it shows us some of the great people of the Bible and some of the worst. It’s The Incredibles and the Malcoms in the Middles thrown together. It’s the Uncle Bobs the mean grannies. Our humility comes from the fact that God uses both. Second, genealogies teach us humility because it shows us that it is not all about us. We come, and we go. We do not live for ever. But God’s work does not stop with us. It goes on and will go on. Does that not humble us?

Conclusion

Let’s face it: genealogies are not the most exciting part of our Scripture reading. They can be a little boring. But, if we take the time to consider a few reasons God gave them to us, it may, like the redemption of sinners by the grace of God, transform something boring into a reminder of God’s Grace.

Rags to Riches: How Jesus’s Incarnation Changes Us

John Calvin, in his massive work Institutes of the Christian Religion (translated by Henry Beveridge), describes the glorious exchange wrought by the incarnation of Jesus Christ.

I am guilty of not meditating on the wonders of the incarnation. The thought that God became man is simply astounding, and yet I do not think about it nearly enough. In my reading of Calvin’s Institutes, I came across this comparison of what we gained and what Jesus loss. It is a thought that draws my mind into deeper meditation and appreciation of Christ’s work in becoming man.

Calvin paints this exquisite picture,

This is the wondrous exchange made by his boundless goodness. Having become with us the Son of man, he has made us with himself sons of God. By his own descent to the earth he has prepared our ascent to heaven. Having received our mortality, he has bestowed on us his immortality. Having undertaken our weakness, he has made us strong in his strength. Having submitted to our poverty, he has transferred to us his riches. Having taken upon himself the burden of unrighteousness with which we were oppressed, he has clothed us with his righteousness. (896-897)

Christian, are you discouraged? Think about Jesus. I end with Paul’s thoughts, “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” (2 Cor. 5:21, ESV)

Guided By Gurnall: Part Five

Gurnall asks the question, “If God be with me by his mighty power to help me, why then is all this befallen me?” (37)

Gurnall, in his second response, delivers the following encouragement:

Christian, candidly interpret God’s dealings with thee….Now take heed of charging God foolishly, as if God were not what he promiseth; this were to give that to Satan which he is all this while gaping for. It is more becoming the dutiful disposition of a child, when he hath not presently what he writes for to his father, to say, My father is wiser than I. His wisdom will prompt him what and when to send to me, and his fatherly affections to me his child will neither suffer him to deny anything that is good, or slip the time that is seasonable. Christian, thy heavenly Father hath gracious ends that hold his hand at present, or else thou hadst ere this heard from him. (39)

What gloriously encouraging words! I am sure that we have all been at a point in our lives in which it seems as if heaven has been emptied of God’s presence. The pain can become so overwhelming that the internal screams seem to drown out any semblance of the comfort of God.

Perhaps we find ourselves in the same predicament as Job. Job says, “Oh, that I knew where I might find him, that I might come even to his seat!” (Job 23:3, ESV) He later declares, “Behold, I go forward, but he is not there, and backward, but I do not perceive him; on the left hand when he is working, I do not behold him,  he turns to the right hand, but I do not see him.” (Job 23:8-9, ESV)

God begins to speak to Job concerning His might, wisdom, and grandeur. (Job 38-41) God never offers the reasons why Job experienced the sufferings he endured. Many times, we are not privy to the reasons why God allows us to suffer. But before we begin to question God or doubt His goodness, let us heed Gurnall’s advice and trust our Heavenly Father.

Catch up on our series below:

Guided by Gurnall: Introduction

Guided by Gurnall: Part One

Guided by Gurnall: Part Two

Guided by Gurnall: Part Three

Guided by Gurnall: Part Four

How To Worship Reverently

How do we worship? Does it matter how?

I am slowly working my way through In Reverence and Awe. It has been superb. Every chapter brings me to the truth that God is a glorious, holy God before Whom I should fall in worship and adoration. I am reminded, on almost every page, that I am a wicked sinner deserving at every moment to be cast into hell for eternity. Thankfully, I am also reminded that Jesus bore God’s righteous indignation and saved me forever.

As the name implies, Hart and Muether discuss worship throughout the book. In chapter eight, the two enumerate on the thought “Worship with Godly Fear.” So, according to the authors, how should we worship?

D. G. Hart and John R. Muether write,

“The joy we experience in contemplating and worshiping the risen Savior is an emotion that is always tinged with sobriety and humility. It is not the high-fiving ecstasy of fans who have just seen their team win the national championship. Nor is it the celebration of a job promotion. It is a joy that recognizes not only the suffering and death of Jesus Christ, but also our own complicity, because our sin, in his pain and death. When we contemplate the suffering of Christ we come in humility, restraining sinful impulses, and we embrace a bleeding Savior as the fountain of our comfort.” (Hart and Muether, 128)

There is a beauty in this type of worship. It is God-honoring, for it does not treat God lightly. Truly He is immanent (or close). However, we must never forget that He is transcendent as well. He is, as Isaiah describes, “One who is high and lifted up, who inhavits eternity, whose name is Holy” (Isaiah 57:15, ESV).

We take too causal an approach to the Holy One of Israel. Hart and Muether argue along the same lines as does the author of Hebrews. “Therefore let us be grateful for receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, and thus let us offer to God acceptable worship, with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire (Hebrews 12:28-29, ESV).

How do we worship? With reverence and awe.

 

 

 

 

Photo by Cullan Smith on Unsplash